A 100% comfortable, 6-sizes-too-big, fantastically comfortable and not too shabby looking nightgown. Head erased, here, so you don't catch my cold and get all puffy-faced, and bleary-eyed, and static-bed-headed-wonkified.

[YOUR SCREEN IS NOT DIRTY – that’s just my poor background erasing skills]. A 6-sizes-too-big fantastically comfortable and not too shabby looking nightgown. Head erased, here, so you don’t catch my cold and get all puffy-faced, and bleary-eyed, and static-bed-headed-wonkified like I was when Paco took this picture, last night.

Guess what? I slept in my new nightgown last night, and it had sleeves. That’s right: I am now a full-service seamstress, in that I can sew the right sides of things together and set sleeves with a minimum of pucker (in the fabric, at any rate). I barely even needed a blanket, so full coverage is this fantastic creation.

Not that there weren’t a few hiccoughs along the way. God bless you, everyone who ever learned to set a sleeve on a flat bed sewing machine. And thank the good Lord above for my tiny little free arm on my tired little Bernina Nova 900.

I love you, Bernina Nova 900. I really, really love you. In honor of the service you performed last night, I have decided to name you Nedwella. A unique name for a unique sewing machine. You may not do much, but what you do do you do very wella.

NOW I WILL TAKE OVER THE WORLD. Or, at least, cut in to some of my prettier fabric for one of my other patterns.

I tried to take pictures of my mistakes as I went along on this project but, frankly, there were too many so I only caught photographic evidence of some of them. Here, then, is a selective record that proves that if you are stubborn enough you can overcome anything in pursuit of a single-minded goal.

Notes About My Sewing

  1. When the suggested pattern layout shows some pattern pieces being cut face down, you better believe the face down part is not a suggestion but an actual instruction. I cut one sleeve and one side of the bodice with the wrong side up and had to cut them over again.
  2. Where sleeves are concerned, I followed Craftsy’s advice and gave up on the easing stitches. I was 100% able to wrap my brain around pinning, adding more and more pins in between pins, but the easing stitches didn’t help me even a little bit. My first attempt resulted in a puffy, puckery mess. Once I switched to the pinning method (and my Bernina), the sleeves were an absolute breeze.
  3. I’m a bit concerned about my Janome 6600P. It did a 100% fabulous job on the stitch I used to attach the blanket binding, but it was hell trying to get the thing to sew a straight seam and it has been since I’ve owned it (purchased new from a dealer in November). Every seam wants to run off the right side of the fabric. It’s like driving a car that’s out of alignment. I’ve never had a problem with sewing a straight seam in the past. On the other hand, I may just be wishing I’d put the money in to a new lower-end Bernina, instead. Oh well. Next project I’ll engage the dual feed mechanism (I had enough to focus on without doing that for this project).
  4. Pin things together before you sew them together. I’m sure some sewists do this to check fit, but for people like me the primary reason for doing this is to ensure you sew the right sides facing each other and the right seams together. Before I finished this nightgown I had sewn, in order…
    The left side of the bodice to the right shoulder seam, wrong sides facing each other.

    The left side of the bodice to the right shoulder seam, wrong sides facing each other.

    The left side of the bodice to the right shoulder *and* the right side of the bodice to the left shoulder *and* both pieces facing the wrong side of the back.

    The left side of the bodice to the right shoulder *and* the right side of the bodice to the left shoulder *and* both pieces facing the wrong side of the back.

    The wrong sides of the front and back bodice together.

    The wrong sides of the front and back bodice together.

    The left sleeve, wrong side out.

    The left sleeve, wrong side out.